These games are on the website www.kongregate.com, free to play. The game is basiclaly a puzzle game and you have to kill yourself. Sounds disturbing but the word “Karoshi” can be translated literally from Japanese as “death from overwork”, is occupational sudden death.  They are fun little games. I remember playing them on NewGrounds awhile back. The pic is from the Kongregate website.Karoshi: Suicide SalarymanSuper Karoshi

These games are on the website www.kongregate.com, free to play. The game is basiclaly a puzzle game and you have to kill yourself. Sounds disturbing but the word “Karoshi” can be translated literally from Japanese as “death from overwork”, is occupational sudden death.  They are fun little games. I remember playing them on NewGrounds awhile back. The pic is from the Kongregate website.

Karoshi: Suicide Salaryman
Super Karoshi

I don’t know if the creator is Japanese but it’s an adorable game. There are three games of it. The creator of the games are ArmorGames.Sushi CatSushi Cat 2Suchi Cat: The HoneymoonCheck out www.kongregate.com to play the games for free. I think you can also get them on your phone but i’m not 100% sure. Oh and yeah you can just go to www.armorgames.com and find them on there. Seriously it’s adorable. The picture from above is a pic from the Kongregate website.

I don’t know if the creator is Japanese but it’s an adorable game. There are three games of it. The creator of the games are ArmorGames.

Sushi Cat
Sushi Cat 2
Suchi Cat: The Honeymoon

Check out www.kongregate.com to play the games for free. I think you can also get them on your phone but i’m not 100% sure. Oh and yeah you can just go to www.armorgames.com and find them on there. Seriously it’s adorable. The picture from above is a pic from the Kongregate website.

J-pop group Chubbiness releases first music videoBy Philip KendallEntertainment Aug. 30, 2014 - 06:01AM JSTBack in January this year, we brought you news of an emerging J-pop group going by the name of Chubbiness. The idea behind the outfit was that, as well as being accomplished singers, the members were all “puniko“, or slightly chubby girls. Compared to most J-pop groups, which are very often populated with girls who are all pointy elbows and shoulder blades, Chubbiness just about lived up to their name, but few Westerners especially would ever think to call them “chubby”.Eight months later, Chubbiness have launched their first official song, complete with an accompanying music video which shows them tucking in to a table full of sugary treats while singing about how there’s nothing wrong with being a bit on the big side.The only thing is, after watching the video a handful of times, we can’t help thinking that if anything the Chubbiness girls actually look even slimmer now than when they were first introduced to us.Shared on YouTube late last week by entertainment group Avex, “Manmadeiiya” (which roughly translates as “fine as we are”) is an undeniably catchy song and ticks all the usual J-pop boxes. The video, too, is bright, colourful and well-shot, and the girls look great. But the message it sends may be a little confusing for some.The video opens with the Chubbiness girls excitedly crowding around a trestle table covered with sugary treats.Before long, they start tucking in and feeding each other doughnuts and marshmallows.We then hear some of the group members panting and complaining about being hot and sweaty. Dressed in a red tracksuit as if working out, we see one of the girls inexplicably find herself holding a giant doughnut instead of her water bottle.Later, we hear the girls complaining about how their breasts are getting sweaty (no, seriously – there’s a weird dance move to go along with it), and wondering whether they’re so hot because their air conditioner had been switched off. They then go back to munching on their giant confectioneries.Other parts of the video are, however, marginally more refreshing to see. Towards the end, for example, one of the singers is seen squeezing the undersides of her (admittedly only very slightly) soft upper arms and pulling at her cheeks while singing about how there’s nothing wrong with being a bit softer here and there.For all of the genuinely positive messages Chubbiness’ first song contains, we still can’t quite bring ourselves to say that we especially like the video. We get it, every group needs a hook, and Chubbiness’ is that the girls are – by J-pop standards – not especially thin, and that’s fine. But maybe instead of telling the world that it’s OK to eat doughnuts and get a bit sweaty while pulling off some pretty gruelling dance routines, a better way to make your point would be to just get on with being a great J-pop group and not keep pointing out how chubby you are, least not when (unless it’s a trick of the light?) a few of your members actually look slightly thinner than they did before?But business is business, we suppose, and perhaps we’re just being sensitive snowflakes about this one. At least Chubbiness are doing something a little bit different, and it is nice to see regular-sized girls shaking their stuff to a catchy beat, so we’re excited to see what they come up with in the future. Just so long as their next video doesn’t show them thrusting fistfuls of butter into their mouths just to prove a point.Read article HERE

J-pop group Chubbiness releases first music video
By Philip Kendall
Entertainment Aug. 30, 2014 - 06:01AM JST

Back in January this year, we brought you news of an emerging J-pop group going by the name of Chubbiness. The idea behind the outfit was that, as well as being accomplished singers, the members were all “puniko“, or slightly chubby girls. Compared to most J-pop groups, which are very often populated with girls who are all pointy elbows and shoulder blades, Chubbiness just about lived up to their name, but few Westerners especially would ever think to call them “chubby”.

Eight months later, Chubbiness have launched their first official song, complete with an accompanying music video which shows them tucking in to a table full of sugary treats while singing about how there’s nothing wrong with being a bit on the big side.

The only thing is, after watching the video a handful of times, we can’t help thinking that if anything the Chubbiness girls actually look even slimmer now than when they were first introduced to us.

Shared on YouTube late last week by entertainment group Avex, “Manmadeiiya” (which roughly translates as “fine as we are”) is an undeniably catchy song and ticks all the usual J-pop boxes. The video, too, is bright, colourful and well-shot, and the girls look great. But the message it sends may be a little confusing for some.

The video opens with the Chubbiness girls excitedly crowding around a trestle table covered with sugary treats.

Before long, they start tucking in and feeding each other doughnuts and marshmallows.

We then hear some of the group members panting and complaining about being hot and sweaty. Dressed in a red tracksuit as if working out, we see one of the girls inexplicably find herself holding a giant doughnut instead of her water bottle.

Later, we hear the girls complaining about how their breasts are getting sweaty (no, seriously – there’s a weird dance move to go along with it), and wondering whether they’re so hot because their air conditioner had been switched off. They then go back to munching on their giant confectioneries.

Other parts of the video are, however, marginally more refreshing to see. Towards the end, for example, one of the singers is seen squeezing the undersides of her (admittedly only very slightly) soft upper arms and pulling at her cheeks while singing about how there’s nothing wrong with being a bit softer here and there.

For all of the genuinely positive messages Chubbiness’ first song contains, we still can’t quite bring ourselves to say that we especially like the video. We get it, every group needs a hook, and Chubbiness’ is that the girls are – by J-pop standards – not especially thin, and that’s fine. But maybe instead of telling the world that it’s OK to eat doughnuts and get a bit sweaty while pulling off some pretty gruelling dance routines, a better way to make your point would be to just get on with being a great J-pop group and not keep pointing out how chubby you are, least not when (unless it’s a trick of the light?) a few of your members actually look slightly thinner than they did before?

But business is business, we suppose, and perhaps we’re just being sensitive snowflakes about this one. At least Chubbiness are doing something a little bit different, and it is nice to see regular-sized girls shaking their stuff to a catchy beat, so we’re excited to see what they come up with in the future. Just so long as their next video doesn’t show them thrusting fistfuls of butter into their mouths just to prove a point.

Read article HERE

Green power blooms as Japan unveils ‘hydrangea solar cell’Technology Aug. 23, 2014 - 06:06AM JSTTOKYO —A solar cell that resembles a flower is offering a new take on green energy in Japan, where one scientist is searching for renewables that look good.In a country badly scarred by the tsunami-sparked nuclear disaster at Fukushima three years ago, the hydrangea-inspired solar offering is small beer alongside one of the world’s biggest offshore wind power farms now floating off the country’s east coast.But Hiroshi Segawa, a professor at University of Tokyo’s Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, is hoping his dye-sensitised solar cell, which meshes floral beauty with cutting-edge technology, will brighten the scene.Segawa’s Annabelle, named after a type of white hydrangea, is made up of flowery stained glass-like solar cells built into a latticed wood box modelled on traditional Japanese doors.While the 20-centimeter-wide box might make a pretty addition to a sunroom, it can also store enough energy to charge your smartphone twice.The leaves generate electricity, which is stored in the flower. As the device charges up the petals turn increasingly blue. But as Annabelle discharges, those blue petals turn white, just like the real-life hydrangea.“People do not have a very good image about things related to energy, such as nuclear power,” Segawa told AFP.“Thermal power generation conjures up images of blistering hot dirty coal while solar panels take up a lot of space.“Even wind power generation has problems with bird strikes and noise, but (Annabelle) doesn’t harm the environment.”While Segawa is not expecting to topple the dominant silicon-based solar panels, he is hoping the fast-growing sector has room for “enjoyable energy” that adds a splash of color to an otherwise drab industry.Since the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, Japan has been pushing to boost the use of alternative energy.The country’s solar power generation is rapidly growing, but it still only represents a small share of the overall power mix.In Japan, the share of power generated from renewable sources, excluding hydropower, lags other developed economies at 4.7% of the total, far less than 10.4% in Britain or 20.1% in Germany, according to data from the International Energy Agency.All of Japan’s nuclear plants were shuttered after the 2011 atomic accident—yanking away a power source that once supplied more than one quarter of the nation’s energy.Despite Tokyo’s efforts to develop the solar sector, the weather—- particularly a lack of reliable sunlight—is among the factors holding back wider use.But Segawa says Annabelle works even in weak indoor light.It also has a myriad of design possibilities. Segawa has already experimented with a cell that looks like French President Francois Hollande and one of the computer-generated Japanese pop star Hatsune Miku.“You can make solar cells out of animated characters, portraits of real people and lots of other stuff,” he said. Read article HERE

Green power blooms as Japan unveils ‘hydrangea solar cell’
Technology Aug. 23, 2014 - 06:06AM JST

TOKYO —

A solar cell that resembles a flower is offering a new take on green energy in Japan, where one scientist is searching for renewables that look good.

In a country badly scarred by the tsunami-sparked nuclear disaster at Fukushima three years ago, the hydrangea-inspired solar offering is small beer alongside one of the world’s biggest offshore wind power farms now floating off the country’s east coast.

But Hiroshi Segawa, a professor at University of Tokyo’s Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, is hoping his dye-sensitised solar cell, which meshes floral beauty with cutting-edge technology, will brighten the scene.

Segawa’s Annabelle, named after a type of white hydrangea, is made up of flowery stained glass-like solar cells built into a latticed wood box modelled on traditional Japanese doors.

While the 20-centimeter-wide box might make a pretty addition to a sunroom, it can also store enough energy to charge your smartphone twice.

The leaves generate electricity, which is stored in the flower. As the device charges up the petals turn increasingly blue. But as Annabelle discharges, those blue petals turn white, just like the real-life hydrangea.

“People do not have a very good image about things related to energy, such as nuclear power,” Segawa told AFP.

“Thermal power generation conjures up images of blistering hot dirty coal while solar panels take up a lot of space.

“Even wind power generation has problems with bird strikes and noise, but (Annabelle) doesn’t harm the environment.”

While Segawa is not expecting to topple the dominant silicon-based solar panels, he is hoping the fast-growing sector has room for “enjoyable energy” that adds a splash of color to an otherwise drab industry.

Since the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, Japan has been pushing to boost the use of alternative energy.

The country’s solar power generation is rapidly growing, but it still only represents a small share of the overall power mix.

In Japan, the share of power generated from renewable sources, excluding hydropower, lags other developed economies at 4.7% of the total, far less than 10.4% in Britain or 20.1% in Germany, according to data from the International Energy Agency.

All of Japan’s nuclear plants were shuttered after the 2011 atomic accident—yanking away a power source that once supplied more than one quarter of the nation’s energy.

Despite Tokyo’s efforts to develop the solar sector, the weather—- particularly a lack of reliable sunlight—is among the factors holding back wider use.

But Segawa says Annabelle works even in weak indoor light.

It also has a myriad of design possibilities. Segawa has already experimented with a cell that looks like French President Francois Hollande and one of the computer-generated Japanese pop star Hatsune Miku.

“You can make solar cells out of animated characters, portraits of real people and lots of other stuff,” he said.

Read article HERE

What the Heck Is a Rice Burger?

Alex Van Buren

Food Features Editor

Aug 19, 2014

This is the the era of the weird burger. You’ve got your grilled cheese burger. Your ramen burger. Your donut burger. 

But it was the newest applicant for residence in Burgerville, USA, that gave us pause: the Rice Burger. 

The folks behind New York City’s Sobaya and Otafuku are trying to tap into the burger craze with their new shop, Yonekichi, where they’re serving up savory things between rice patty “buns.”

According to Yonekichi operations manager Sakura Yagi, “rice burgers” are big at fast food restaurants in Japan. She’s contracted an outside company to create an “exclusive,” additive-free, compressed rice patty for the United States shop, and while she won’t say much more than that, one employee told us it holds together simply because “Japanese rice is sticky.” The patties are totally salt-free “to keep it simple and preserve the taste of the rice,” said Yagi.

So, what does Yonekichi put between two rice patties?

The sky’s the limit, apparently. Rice! Eel! Salmon! Beef! Pork! Chicken! 

This writer tried four: chicken, salmon, beef, and “onion-kale-carrot mixed tempura.” First thought? “It’s weird to have sushi on your burger.”

As opposed to sushi rice that’s typically seasoned with vinegar, unseasoned white rice that’s been pressed and crisped on a hot griddle didn’t seem like an intuitive match for these other ingredients.Each patty’s texture was disjointedly crisp on one side and gummy on the other. (Since this is only a soft opening and she’s gathering customer feedback, Yagi said, she’s open to revisiting the recipe.) 

Of the four patties, the beef “burger” was the best. Ample amounts of soy, sugar, and sake were in the mix with thinly sliced beef, which was layered with lettuce and caramelized onions. 

It felt—and looked—like a late-night compromise between two people on a date, with one tipsily declaring, “I want a burger!” and the other demanding sushi. 

But one might root for Yonekichi: If that recipe pulls together, this sushi burger could actually work. 

Read article HERE

Japan’s youth Olympians told to keep low profile in China
SPORTS AUG. 12, 2014 - 06:49AM JST

TOKYO —
Japanese athletes at this month’s Youth Olympics in the Chinese city of Nanjing have been warned not to wear their official tracksuits around town due to safety fears, local media have reported.

Delegation chief Yosuke Fujiwara has told Japan’s 78 athletes to wear regular clothes outside the Games venues during the Aug 16-28 event to avoid any attack, with Tokyo-Beijing relations at their lowest level in years.

The teenage athletes will also be encouraged to don face masks to protect themselves from China’s notoriously bad air pollution.

“When they are outside, we want them to be aware that it might not be totally safe,” Fujiwara told Kyodo news agency.

“In the athletes’ village, we want them to wear the official Japan tracksuit, but in the city normal clothes are fine.”

In an apparent attempt to avoid upsetting the Chinese before the second edition of the Youth Games, Fujiwara added: “You can get random attacks on the street in Japan too.”

Anti-Japanese resentment runs particularly high in Nanjing, where China says 300,000 people—some estimates are lower—were killed in 1937 as Japanese troops rampaged through the city during their invasion of the mainland. It became known as the Nanjing Massacre.

The massacre was the Japanese military’s worst atrocity and remains a bitter stain on the two countries’ relationship.

Fujiwara’s comments came at a time of heightened political tension between Japan and China, which are at odds over claims to islands in the East China Sea and historical grievances tied to Japan’s wartime aggression.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s recent decision to relax strict rules governing the country’s military has further antagonised Beijing, prompting Fujiwara to issue the warning.

But he insisted that the contestants would still be free to explore the city.

“We think it’s better for the athletes to feel the atmosphere in the city from their own perspective,” Fujiwara said.

Japanese sports teams and the country’s national anthem are frequently booed in China, most notably at the 2004 Asian Cup football final between China and Japan in Beijing which ended in a full-scale riot after Japan’s controversial win.

Japan’s delegation arrives in Nanjing on Wednesday. It features girls’ badminton junior world champion Akane Yamaguchi and Yuto Muramatsu, who won bronze in the men’s singles at the Japan Open table tennis earlier this year.

The event is open to athletes aged between 14 and 18. The first Youth Games were held in Singapore four years ago.

Read article HERE

Japan’s youth Olympians told to keep low profile in China

SPORTS AUG. 12, 2014 - 06:49AM JST

TOKYO —

Japanese athletes at this month’s Youth Olympics in the Chinese city of Nanjing have been warned not to wear their official tracksuits around town due to safety fears, local media have reported.

Delegation chief Yosuke Fujiwara has told Japan’s 78 athletes to wear regular clothes outside the Games venues during the Aug 16-28 event to avoid any attack, with Tokyo-Beijing relations at their lowest level in years.

The teenage athletes will also be encouraged to don face masks to protect themselves from China’s notoriously bad air pollution.

“When they are outside, we want them to be aware that it might not be totally safe,” Fujiwara told Kyodo news agency.

“In the athletes’ village, we want them to wear the official Japan tracksuit, but in the city normal clothes are fine.”

In an apparent attempt to avoid upsetting the Chinese before the second edition of the Youth Games, Fujiwara added: “You can get random attacks on the street in Japan too.”

Anti-Japanese resentment runs particularly high in Nanjing, where China says 300,000 people—some estimates are lower—were killed in 1937 as Japanese troops rampaged through the city during their invasion of the mainland. It became known as the Nanjing Massacre.

The massacre was the Japanese military’s worst atrocity and remains a bitter stain on the two countries’ relationship.

Fujiwara’s comments came at a time of heightened political tension between Japan and China, which are at odds over claims to islands in the East China Sea and historical grievances tied to Japan’s wartime aggression.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s recent decision to relax strict rules governing the country’s military has further antagonised Beijing, prompting Fujiwara to issue the warning.

But he insisted that the contestants would still be free to explore the city.

“We think it’s better for the athletes to feel the atmosphere in the city from their own perspective,” Fujiwara said.

Japanese sports teams and the country’s national anthem are frequently booed in China, most notably at the 2004 Asian Cup football final between China and Japan in Beijing which ended in a full-scale riot after Japan’s controversial win.

Japan’s delegation arrives in Nanjing on Wednesday. It features girls’ badminton junior world champion Akane Yamaguchi and Yuto Muramatsu, who won bronze in the men’s singles at the Japan Open table tennis earlier this year.

The event is open to athletes aged between 14 and 18. The first Youth Games were held in Singapore four years ago.

Read article HERE